Internet Marketing Terms Glossary

True actions for Goals

301 Redirect – A message that the URL has moved permanently. This is commonly used when a URL has a new location and will not be appearing again at the old URL.

302 Redirect – A “found” message. (Also referred to as a “temporary redirect.”) This form of redirection is commonly used — and in some cases abused — when a URL has been moved to a different location; but, it will be returning to the original location eventually.

403 Server Code – A “forbidden” message. Prevents access to a URL and displays the reason for preventing access.

404 Server Code – A “not found” message. Server cannot find the URL requested.

API – Acronym for Application Programming Interface.

A/B Testing – A/B testing, at its simplest, is randomly showing a visitor one version of a page – (A) version or (B) version – and tracking the changes in behavior based on which version they saw.

Absolute URL’s Link – Absolute URLs use the full-path address, such as http://www.domain.com/page1.htm.

Acquisition Strategy – A process of finding those potential customers who are in the market and ready to buy.

Ad – Advertisements a searcher sees after submitting a query in a search engine or web site search box

Ad Copy – The main text of a clickable search or context-served ad

Ad Title – The first line of text displayed in a clickable search or context-served ad. Ad Titles serve as ad headlines.

Affiliate Marketing – Affiliate marketing is a process of revenue sharing that allows merchants to duplicate sales efforts by enlisting other web sites as a type of outside sales force.

Algorithm – A set of rules that a search engine uses to rank listings in response to a query.

ALT Text – Also known as alternative text or alt attribute. An HTML tag (ALT tag) used to provide images with a text description in the event images are turned off in a web browser.

Anchor Text – Words used to link to a page, known as anchor text are an important signal to search engines to determine a page’s relevance.

AdSense – Google AdSense is a pay-per-click advertisement application which is available to bloggers and Web publishers as a way to generate revenue from the traffic on their sites. The owner of the site selects which ads they will host, and AdSense pays the owner each time an ad is clicked.

AdCenter – See “Microsoft adCenter.”

AdWords – The pay-per-click (PPC) search-engine marketing (SEM) program provided by Google.

Akismet – A widely used application for blogging platforms, such as WordPress, that functions as a filter for trapping link spam, comment spam and other forms of undesirable user-generated content.

Avatar – A graphical representation of a real person, often seen in user profiles for online forums, social networks or chat/instant-message services. Avatars can be two-dimensional images, representing the author of a blog or microblog; or they can be three-dimensional figures, occupying space in a virtual world, such as Second Life.

Abandonment Rate – See “bounce rate.”

Alexa – A website and toolbar that tracks the number of hits (visitors) to a particular website and ranks them based on this amount.

B2B – Stands for “Business to Business.” A business that markets its services or products to other businesses.

B2C – Stands for “Business to Consumer.” A business that markets its services or products to consumers.

Backlinks –  All the links pointing at a particular web page. Also called inbound links.

Ban – Also known as Delisting. Refers to a punitive action imposed by a search engine in response to being spammed. Can be an IP address of a specific URL

Baseline Metrics – Time-lagged calculations (usually averages of one sort or another) which provide a basis for making comparisons of past performance to current performance.

Behavioral Targeting – The practice of targeting and serving ads to groups of people who exhibit similarities not only in their location, gender or age, but also in how they act and react in their online environment.

Bid – The maximum amount of money that an advertiser is willing to pay each time a searcher clicks on an ad. Bid prices can vary widely depending on competition from other advertisers and keyword popularity.

Bid Boosting – A form of automated bid management that allows you to increase your bids when ads are served to someone whose age or gender matches your target market.

Bid Management Software – Software that manages PPC campaigns automatically, called either rules-based (with triggering rules or conditions set by the advertiser) or intelligent software (enacting real-time adjustments based on tracked conversions and competitor actions).

Blacklists – A list of Web sites that are considered off limits or dangerous.

Blogs – A truncated form for “web log.” A blog is a frequently updated journal that is intended for general public consumption.

Brand – Customer or user experience represented by images and ideas, often referring to a symbol (name, logo, symbols, fonts, colors), a slogan and a design scheme.

Brand and Branding – “A brand is a customer experience represented by a collection of images and ideas; often, it refers to a symbol such as a name, logo, slogan, and design scheme.

Brand Reputation – The position a company brand occupies.

Branding Strategy – The attempt to develop a strong brand reputation on the web to increase brand recognition and create a significant volume of impressions.

Bridge Page – Often used to describe the web pages that linked together many doorway pages on a web site. Also see: Doorway PageHallway Page.

Bucket – An associative grouping for related concepts, keywords, behaviors and audience characteristics associated with your company’s product or service.

Banner Ad – Graphical image or small animation file embedded within a Web page and used for advertising, often containing a link to other sites, products, etc.

Blogger – An individual who generates content for blogs, either personal or professional. Reasons for being a professional blogger are many: delivering timely commentary; showcasing expertise; engaging with audiences and fellow bloggers; and building personal brands.

Blogroll – A list of recommended or similar blogs that a blogger lists on his or her own blog as a resource for the audience.

Bookmarking – The act of saving a website address for future reference. Social bookmarking allows visitors to easily share groups of bookmarks with each other across computers regardless of browser, as well as comment on and rate the stored content.

Bounce Rate – Refers to the percentage of a given page’s visitors who exit without visiting another page on the same site. This term is often used in e-commerce in conjunction with merchandise shopping carts. Also known as “abandonment rate.”

Broken Links – Links to pages which no longer exist or have been moved to a different URL without redirection. These links usually serve pages with the “404 error” message (see “404 error”). Incidentally, most search engines provide ways for visitors to report on broken or “dead” links.

COA – Acronym for Cost of Acquisition, which is how much it costs to acquire a conversion (desired action), such as a sale.

CPA – Acronym for Cost Per Acquisition (sometimes called Cost Per Action), which is the total cost of an ad campaign divided by the number of conversions.

CPA or “Cost Per Acquisition” – Also referred to as “Cost Per Action.” This is a metric used to measure the total monetary cost of each sale, lead or action from start to finish.

CPC – Acronym for Cost Per Click, or the amount search engines charge advertisers for every click that sends a searcher to the advertiser’s web site.

CPC or “Cost Per Click” – Some search engines charge advertisers a cost for every click sent to their web site. The “CPC” is the total cost for each click received.

CPM – Acronym for Cost Per Thousand Impressions (ad serves or potential viewers). Compare to CPC pricing (defined above). CPM is a standard monetization model for offline display ad space, as well as for some context-based networks serving online search ads to, for example, web publishers and sites.

CPM or “Cost Per Thousand” – A unit of measure typically assigned to the cost of displaying an ad. If an ad appears on a web page 1,000 times and costs $5, then the CPM would be $5. In this instance, every 1,000 times an ad appeared, it would incur a charge of $5.

CPO – Acronym for Cost Per Order. The dollar amount of advertising or marketing necessary to acquire an order. Calculated by dividing marketing expenses by the number of orders. Also referred to as CPA (Cost Per Acquisition).

CTR – Acronym for Click-Through Rate, the number of clicks that an ad gets, divided by the total number of times that ad is displayed or served. (Represented as: total clicks / total impressions for a specific ad = CTR).

CRO – Conversion Rate Optimisation. The conversion rate is how many people go from just browsing to making a purchase, or becoming a customer.

Campaign Integration – Planning and executing a paid search campaign concurrently with other marketing initiatives, online or offline, or both.

Canonicalization – The process of picking the best URL when there are several choices; this usually refers to home pages.

Canonical: If there are multiple versions of similar pages, the canonical rel tag tells the WebCrawler that the page linked is the definitive version. Each non-canonical page must link to the canonical version with this link.

Cascading Style Sheets or CSS – An addition to your HTML, a web site’s “cascading style sheet” contains information on paragraph layout, font sizes, colors, etc.

Click Bot – A program generally used to artificially click on paid listings within the engines in order to artificially inflate click amounts.

Click Fraud – Clicks on a Pay-Per-Click advertisement that are motivated by something other than a search for the advertised product or service.

Click Through – When a user clicks on a hypertext link and is taken to the destination of that link

Click Through Rate – The percentage of people who actually click on a link (e.g., in an email message or sponsored ad) after seeing it.

Client-side Tracking – Client-side tracking entails the process of tagging every page that requires tracking on the Web site with a block of JavaScript code.

Cloaking – The process by which a web site can display different versions of a web page under different circumstances

Competitive Analysis –The assessment and analysis of strengths and weaknesses of competing web sites, including identifying traffic patterns, major traffic sources, and keyword selection.

Content Management Systems (CMS) – In computing, a content management system (CMS) is a document centric collaborative application for managing documents and other content.

Content Network – Also called Contextual Networks, content networks include Google and Yahoo! Contextual Search networks that serve paid search ads triggered by keywords related to the page content a user is viewing.

Content Targeting – An ad serving process in Google and Yahoo! that displays keyword triggered ads related to the content or subject (context) of the web site a user is viewing.

Contextual Advertising – Advertising that is automatically served or placed on a web page based on the page’s content, keywords and phrases.

Contextual Distribution – The marketing decision to display search ads on certain publisher sites across the web instead of, or in addition to, placing PPC ads on search networks.

Contextual Network – Also called Content Ads and Content Network, contextual network ads are served on web site pages adjacent to content that contains the keywords being bid upon.

Contextual Search – A search that analyzes the page being viewed by a user and gives a list of related search results. Offered by Yahoo! and Google.

Contextual Search Campaigns – A paid placement search campaign that takes a search ad listing beyond search engine results pages and onto the sites of matched content web partners.

Conversion Action – The desired action you want a visitor to take on your site.

Conversion Rate – Conversion rates are measurements that determine how many of your prospects perform the prescribed or desired action step.

Copyright – Protection and ownership of works or expressions fixed in a tangible form, including words, art, images, sounds, and music.

Crawler: Also known as a bot and spider, a crawler is a program that search engines use to seek out information on the web.

Creatives – Unique words, design and display of a paid-space advertisement.

Custom Feed – Create custom feeds for each of the shopping engines that allow you to submit XML feeds. Each of the engines has different product categories and feed requirements.

Categories – Ways to organize content on a site, especially blogs. One typical way to store both current and archival blog posts is by an alphabetical list of topical categories.

Collaboration – In reference to Web 2.0, this concept states that shared contributions of large numbers of individuals, using social media tools, is a main driver of quality content on the Internet.

Collective Intelligence – The idea that a community or group of individuals is more efficiently capable of higher thought processes than an individual. Social-media applications of this concept include online communities which provide user-created informative content, such as Wikipedia.

Comments – Comments are content generated by users in response to an initial publication, most notably blog posts. These are usually posted below the blog entry, and can often be vehicles for creating advanced levels of discussion that increase the lifespan of blog posts. Comments are also typically associated with news articles, videos, media-sharing sites, and Facebook posts.

Conversion – A desired action taken by a website visitor, such as making a purchase, registering for an event, subscribing to an e-newsletter, completing a lead-gen form, downloading a file, etc.

DHTML – Stands for Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language.

DKI – Acronym for Dynamic Keyword Insertion, the insertion of the EXACT keywords a searcher included in his or her search request in the returned ad title or description

DMCA – Acronym for Digital Millennium Copyright Act. “The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which….criminalizes production and dissemination of technology, devices, or services that are used to circumvent measures that control access to copyrighted works (commonly known as DRM), and criminalizes the act of circumventing an access control, even when there is no infringement of copyright itself. [

Deep Linking – Linking that guides, directs and links a click-through searcher (or a search engine crawler) to a very specific and relevant product or category web page from search terms and PPC ads.

Description Tag – Refers to the information contained in the description META tag. This tag is meant to hold the brief description of the web page it is included on.

Directory Search – Also known as a search directory. Refers to a directory of web sites contained in an engine that are categorized into topics. The main difference between a search directory and a search engine is in how the listings are obtained.

Display URL – The web page URL that one actually sees in a PPC text ad. Display URL usually appears as the last line in the ad; it may be a simplified path for the longer actual URL, which is not visible.

Distribution Network – A network of web sites (content publishers, ISPs) or search engines and their partner sites on which paid ads can be distributed.

Domain – Refers to a specific web site address.

Domain Authority – This is a scale from 1-100 that search engines use to determine how authoritative a company’s website is, 1 being the lowest rank and 100 being the highest. The higher your domain authority the more Search Engines trust you.

Doorway Page – A web page specifically created in order to obtain rankings within the natural listings of a search engine. These pages generally are filled with keywords and are meant to funnel surfers into the main web site.

Dynamic Landing Pages – Dynamic landing pages are web pages to which click-through searchers are sent that generate changeable (not static) pages with content specifically relevant to the keyword search.

Dynamic Text (Insertion) – This is text, a keyword or ad copy that customizes search ads returned to a searcher by using parameters to insert the desired text somewhere in the title or ad. When the search query matches the defined parameter (then the associated term is plugged into the ad. Dynamic insertion makes the ad mirror exact terms used in the search query, creating very relevant ads.

Del.icio.us – A popular social bookmarking site which allows members to share, store and organize their favorite online content.

Digg – Not as popular as it once was, Digg is a tech-centric social bookmarking and crowdsourcing site with a large, devoted audience that famously directs server-busting traffic to websites that have articles linked from its popular top rankings.

DMOZ – Also known as the Open Directory Project, this continually expanding directory is run by volunteers. It claims to be the largest (and is one of the most famous) of the human-edited directories.

eCPM – Acronym for Effective Cost Per Thousand, a hybrid Cost-Per-Click (CPC) auction calculated by multiplying the CPC times the click-through rate (CTR), and multiplying that by one thousand. (Represented by: (CPC x CTR) x 1000 = eCPM.)

Ecommerce – Conducting commercial transactions on the internet where goods, information or services are bought and sold.

FAQ – Stands for “Frequently Asked Questions.”

F.F.A – Stands for “Free for All” link pages.

F.T.P – Stands for “File Transfer Protocol.”

Feeds – A web document that is a shortened or updated (revised content only) version of a web page created for syndication.

Facebook – A dominant, free-access social-networking site which is available to companies and any person 13 years of age or older. Facebook was initially non-commercial and limited to students with a college email domain, but has since expanded to accommodate fan pages, paid advertising, and e-commerce stores.

Flickr – A media-hosting network where users can upload and share image files. It is the largest photo-storage and photo-sharing site on the Web.

Geo-Targeting – The geographic location of the searcher. Geo-targeting allows you to specify where your ads will or won’t be shown based on the searcher’s location, enabling more localized and personalized results.

Google Trends: A tool that shows search density by keyword. It can show the keyword popularity in comparison to others, as well as popularity over a given amount of time.

Google Analytics – A free, browser based tool that allows users to track many different statistics concerning an owned website.

.htaccess file – A file with one or more configuration directives placed in a web site document directory. The directives apply to that directory and all sub-directories.

HTTP – Stands for “Hypertext Transfer Protocol.”

HTTPS – Stands for “Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure.”

Hidden text – Text that is visible to the search engines but hidden to a user.

Hit – The request or retrieval of any item located within a web page. For example, if a user enters a web page with 5 pictures on it, it would be counted as 6 “hits.” One hit is counted for the web page itself, and another 5 hits count for the pictures.

Impression – One view or display of an ad. Ad reports list total impressions per ad, which tells you the number of times your ad was served by the search engine when searchers entered your keywords (or viewed a content page containing your keywords).

Index – A search engine’s “index” refers to the amount of documents found by a search engines crawler on the web.

Inbound Link – A link from another website directed to yours, also known as a “backlink.” Related marketing areas that focus on inbound links include link popularity,social media and online PR, all of which explore ways to collect quality links from other websites.

JavaScript – JavaScript is a scripting language based on prototype-based programming. It is used on a web site as client-side JavaScript, and also to enable scripting access to objects in other applications.

Keyword – A single word that relates to a specific subject or topic. For example, “glossary” would be a keyword for this document.

Keyword Phrase – A specific word or combination of words that a searcher might type into a search field. Includes generic, category keywords; industry-specific terms; product brands; common misspellings and expanded variations (called Keyword Stemming), or multiple words (called Long Tail for their lower CTRs but sometimes better conversion rates).

Keyword Density- The number of times a keyword or keyword phrase is used in the body of a page.

Keyword Phrase – Two or more keywords relating to a specific topic. For example, “Mind numbingly boring glossary” would be a keyword phrase to describe this document.

Keyword Stuffing – Generally refers to the act of adding an inordinate number of keyword terms into the HTML or tags of a web page.

Keyword Tag – Refers to the META keywords tag within a web page. This tag is meant to hold approximately 8 – 10 keywords or keyword phrases, Keyword tags are sometimes used for internal search results as well as viewed by search engines.

Keyword Targeting – Displaying Pay Per Click search ads on publisher sites across the Web that contain the keywords in a context advertiser’s Ad Group.

KPI, Key Performance Indicators — KPI are metrics used to quantify objectives that reflect the strategic performance of your online marketing campaigns.

Landing Page / Destination Page – The web page at which a searcher arrives after clicking on an ad. When creating a PPC ad, the advertiser displays a URL (and specifies the exact page URL in the code) on which the searcher will land after clicking on an ad in the SERP.

Latent Semantic Indexing – LSI uses word associations to help search engines know more accurately what a page is about.

Lead Generation – Web sites that generate leads for products or services offered by another company. On a lead generation site, the visitor is unable to make a purchase but will fill out a contact form in order to get more information about the product or service presented. A submitted contact form is considered a lead. It contains personal information about a visitor who has some degree of interest in a product or service.

Link Popularity – Link popularity generally refers to the total number of links pointing to any particular URL. There are typically two types of link popularity: Internal and External.

Linking Profile – A profile is a representation of the extent to which something exhibits various characteristics.

Log File – All server software stores information about web site incoming and outgoing activities.

Log File Analysis – The analysis of records stored in the log file. In its raw format, the data in the log files can be hard to read and overwhelming.

Long Tail Keywords  – Keyword phrases with at least three, sometimes four or five, words in them. These long tail keywords are usually highly specific and draw lower traffic than shorter, more competitive keyword phrases, which is why they are also cheaper.

LinkedIn – A business-oriented social networking site for professionals. Much like Facebook, LinkedIn allows members to connect with other users on the network, share status updates, and participate in groups and chats, although with a career focus.

Meta Feeds – Ad networks that pull advertiser listings from other providers. They may or may not have their own distribution and advertiser networks.

META Refresh redirect – A client-side redirect.

Metrics – A system of measures that helps to quantify particular characteristics. In SEO the following are some important metrics to measure: overall traffic, search engine traffic, conversions, top traffic-driving keywords, top conversion-driving keywords, keyword rankings, etc.

Minimum Bid – The least amount that an advertiser can bid for a keyword or keyword phrase and still be active on the search ad network. This amount can range from $0.01 to $0.50 (or more for highly competitive keywords), and are set by the search engine.

Mod_rewrite – URL Rewrite processes, also known as “mod rewrites,” are employed when a webmaster decides to reorganize a current web site, either for the benefit of better user experience with a new directory structure or to clean up URLs which are difficult for search engines to index.

Microblog – A microblog is a social media utility where users can share short status updates and information. The most famous example is Twitter, which combines aspects of blogs (personalized Web posting) with aspects of social networking sites (making and tracking connections, or “friends”).

Meta-Search Engine – A search engine that does not compile its own independent results, but rather pulls data from two or more search engines, such as Dogpile.com.

Meta-Tags – Also called meta-data, this information found in HTML page headers used to be the bread and butter of SEO marketing tactics. Still used today despite widely perceived diminishing relevance to search-engine rankings, the most common are the “title,” “description,” and “keyword” tags (see below).

Meta-Description Tag – A tag on a Web page located in the heading source code containing a basic description of the page. It helps search engines categorize the page and can potentially inform users who come across the page listing in search results.

Meta-Keywords Tag – In the past, this tag allowed page authors to insert a massive list of keywords related (and occasionally unrelated) to a page in order to game search-engine results. Today, this tag’s potential to influence rankings has diminished to the point where it is widely disregarded by major search engines.

Microsoft adCenter – The pay-per-click (PPC) search-engine advertising program provided by Microsoft in conjunction with its Bing search engine, now also populating Yahoo! search results.

Naked Links – A posted and visible link in the text of a web page that directs to a web site.

Negative Keywords – Filtered-out keywords to prevent ad serves on them in order to avoid irrelevant click-through charges on, for example, products that you do not sell, or to refine and narrow the targeting of your Ad Group’s keywords.

No Frames Tag – A tag used to describe the content of a frame to a user or engine which had trouble displaying / reading frames. Frequently misused and often referred to as “Poor mans cloaking”.

No Script Tag – The noscript element is used to define an alternate content (text) if a script is NOT executed. This tag is used for browsers that recognizes the <script> tag, but does not support the script in it.

NoFollow – NoFollow is an attribute webmasters can place on links that tell search engines not to count the link as a vote or not to send any trust to that site. Search engines will follow the link, yet it will not influence search results. NoFollows can be added to any link with this code: “rel=”nofollow”.”

Organic Results – Listings on SERPs that were not paid for; listings for which search engines do not sell space.

Organic Search Listings – Listings that search engines do not sell (unlike paid listings

Organic Search Rankings – Search engine ranking of web pages found in SERPs.

Outbound Link – Any link on a Web page to an external Web page.

Organic Traffic – This is traffic that is generated to your website which is generated by a Search Engine. This could be traffic from Google, Yahoo or Bing. It’s also known as “Free” traffic. Organic traffic is the best type of traffic!

PPC – Acronym for Pay Per Click.

PPCSE – Acronym for Pay-Per-Click Search Engine.

Page Rank (PR) – PR is the Google technology developed at Stanford University for placing importance on pages and web sites.

Paid Inclusion – Refers to the process of paying a fee to a search engine in order to be included in that search engine or directory

Pay Per Call – A model of paid advertising similar to Pay Per Click (PPC), except advertisers pay for every phone call that comes to them from a search ad, rather than for every click-through to their web site landing page for the ad. Often higher cost than PPC advertising; but valued by advertisers for higher conversion rates from consumers who take the action step of telephoning an advertiser.

Personas – These are “people types” or sub-groups that encompass several attributes, such as gender, age, location, salary level, leisure activities, lifestyle characteristics, marital/family status or some kind of definable behavior. Useful profiles for focusing ad messages and offers to targeted segments.

Podcasts – “A podcast is a media file that is distributed over the internet using syndication feeds, for playback on portable media players and personal computers. Like ‘radio,’ it can mean both the content and the method of syndication. The latter may also be termed podcasting. The host or author of a podcast is often called a podcaster.” Source: Wikipedia

Position – In PPC advertising, position is the placement on a search engine results page where your ad appears relative to other paid ads and to organic search results.

PPC Advertising – Acronym for Pay-Per-Click Advertising, a model of online advertising in which advertisers pay only for each click on their ads that directs searchers to a specified landing page on the advertiser’s web site.

PPC Management – The monitoring and maintenance of a Pay-Per-Click campaign or campaigns.

Paid Listings – Listings sold to advertisers for a fee. Also known as “paid placement.” See “pay-per-click.”

Paid Placement – See “pay-per-click.”

Pay-For-Performance – A paid-search system nearly identical to (and essentially synonymous with) pay-per-click.

Peer-to-peer (P2P) – Refers to any type of interaction between two or more people within a specific social network. Most viral media by definition get their popularity via such P2P sharing. The term is also widely associated with (often illicit) file-sharing networks for music and movies, though not exclusive to that realm.

QualityScore – A number assigned by Google to paid ads in a hybrid auction that, together with maximum CPC, determines each ad’s rank and SERP position.

Query – The keyword or keyword phrase a searcher enters into a search field, which initiates a search and results in a SERP with organic and paid listings.

ROAS – Acronym for Return On Advertising Spending, the profit generated by ad campaign conversions per dollar spent on advertising expenses.

ROI – Acronym for Return On Investment, the amount of money you make on your ads compared to the amount of money you spend on your ads.

RSS – Acronym for Rich Site Summary or Real Simple Syndication, a family of web feed formats that leverages XML for distributing and sharing headlines and information from other web content (also known as syndication).

Reciprocal Link – Two different sites that link out to each other. Also referred to as Cross Linking.

Relevance – In relation to PPC advertising, relevance is a measure of how closely your ad title, description, and keywords are related to the search query and the searcher’s expectations.

Reverse DNS – A process to determine the hostname or host associated with an IP or host address.

Revshare / RevenueSharing – A method of allocating per-click revenue to a site publisher, and click-through charges to a search engine that distributes paid-ads to its context network partners, for every page viewer who clicks on the content site’s sponsored ads.

Rich Media – Media with embedded motion or interactivity.

Robots.txt – A text file present in the root directory of a website which is used to direct the activity of search engine crawlers. This file is typically used to tell a crawler which portions of the site should be crawled and which should not be crawled.

RSS (Really Simply Syndication, Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary) – A family of web feed formats used for distributing frequently updated digital content, such as blogs, news, podcasts, and videos

SEM – Acronym for “Search Engine Marketing.” A form of internet marketing that seeks to promote websites by increasing their visibility in search engine result pages (SERPs). SEM methods include: search engine optimization (SEO), paid placement, contextual advertising, digital asset optimization, and paid inclusion. When this term is used to describe an individual, it stands for “Search Engine Marketer” or one who performs SEM.

SEO – Acronym for “Search Engine Optimization.” This is the process of editing a web site’s content and code in order to improve visibility within one or more search engines. When this term is used to describe an individual, it stands for “Search Engine Optimizer” or one who performs SEO.

SERP – Acronym for Search Engine Results Page, the page delivered to a searcher that displays the results of a search query entered into the search field.

Saturation (Search Engine Saturation) — A term relating to the number of URLs included from a specific web site in any given search engine. The higher the saturation level or number of pages indexed into a search engine, the higher the potential traffic levels and rankings.

Search Directory – Similar to a search engine, in that they both compile databases of web sites. A directory does not use crawlers in order to obtain entries in its search database

Search Engines – A search engine is a database of many web pages. Most engines display the number of web pages they hold in their database at any given time.

Search Query – The word or phrase a searcher types into a search field, which initiates search engine results page listings and PPC ad serves.

Server-side Tracking –– The process of analyzing web server log files. Server-side analytics tools make sense of raw data to generate meaningful reports and trends analysis.

Session Id’s – dynamic parameters, such as session IDs generated by cookies for each individual user. Session IDs cause search engines to see a different URL for each page each time that they return to re-crawl a web site.

Spamming – Spamming refers to a wide array of techniques used to “trick” the search engines. These tactics generally are against the guidelines put forth by the search engines. Tactics such as Hidden text, Doorway Pages, Content Duplication and Link Farming are but a few of many spam techniques employed over the years.

Spider – Acronym for Crawler.

Sponsored Listing – A term used as a title or column head on SERPs to identify paid advertisers and distinguish between paid and organic listings.

Stop Word A word that often appears in a page’s copy or content, but it has no significance by itself. Examples of stop words are: and, the, of, etc.

Submission – The act of submitting a web site to search engines and search directories. For some search engines, this is performed simply by typing in the absolute home page URL of the web site you wish to submit. Other engines and directories request that descriptions of the web site be submitted for approval.

TLP – Acronym for Top Level Page, a reference to the home page, category pages, or product pages that have unique value for the site and so are structured in the top levels of the site directory.

Targeting – Narrowly focusing ads and keywords to attract a specific, marketing-profiled searcher and potential customer.

Themes – A theme is an overall idea of what a web page is focused on. Search engines determine the theme of a web page through analysis in the algorithm of the density of associated words on a page.

Title Tag – An HTML tag appearing in the tag of a web page that contains the page title. The page title should be determined by the relevant contents of that specific web page. The contents of a title tag for a web page is generally displayed in a search engine result as a bold blue underlined hyperlink.

Trackbacks – A protocol that allows a blogger to link to posts, often on other blogs, that relate to a selected subject.

Tracking URL – A specially designed and/or unique URL created to track an action or conversion from paid advertising.

Trademarks – Distinctive symbols, pictures or words that identify a specific product or service.

Traffic – Refers to the number of visitors a website receives. It can be determined by examination of web logs.

Traffic Analysis – The process of analyzing traffic to a web site to understand what visitors are searching for and what is driving traffic to a site.

User Agent – This is the identity of a web site visitor, spider, browser, etc. The most common user agents are Mozilla and Internet Explorer.

Viral Marketing – Also called viral advertising, viral marketing refers to marketing techniques that use pre-existing social networks to produce increases in brand awareness.

XML – Stands for “Extensible Markup Language,” a data delivery language.

XML Feeds – A form of paid inclusion in which a search engine is fed information about an advertiser’s web pages via XML, rather than requiring that the engine gather that information through crawling actual pages.

XML Maps – XML maps are specially formatted links to your pages. They will never replace the need for HTML site maps.